• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
November 21

Offsite Talk: Native American Identity & the Politics of the Poetic Image 

readings & workshops
December 3

Ultimate Truth Poetry Reading and Book Release

readings & workshops
December 6

Heddy Keith author of Through it All

readings & workshops
December 9

Poetry Reading: Tonya M. Foster & Samiya Bashir

performances
December 10

Alternating Currents Live presents Nicole Mitchell Quartet

special events
January 27 -28

24th Annual Poetry Marathon & Benefit

Margaret Rozga

Poet and Civil Rights activist Margaret (Peggy) Rozga is author of 200 Nights and One Day (Benu Press, 2009). Her play, March on Milwaukee: A Memoir of the Open Housing Protests, is based on her experience in the civil rights movement in Milwaukee. In 2007, she received the UW Colleges Chancellor's award for outstanding achievement for the events she organized to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Milwaukee's open housing marches.

 

This book of poetry presents a brilliant analysis which takes us through the brave history of the strength, commitment and passion of the people of Milwaukee, Wisconsin as they marched, struggled and were jailed to win the victory of justice and freedom for all. Peggy Rozga joined protestors, participated in freedom marches, and was jailed for fighting and marching for the rights of poor Black children of the city of Milwaukee under the leadership of one of the great advocates of non-violence, direct action and civil disobedience of our times: Father James Edmund Groppi.

-Dick Gregory

 

What the open housing marches did for set territorial boundaries in Milwaukee these poems do with traditional poetic forms. The old boundaries are questioned, rearranged, expanded, and maybe abandoned."
- Margaret Rozga

Selected Poems

Inner City


Margaret Rozga

 

They took me into an interrogation room, kept
calling me Robert, which usually only nuns did. 
Asked me if Father Groppi was planning a riot.
I just shook my head. They were crazy.

Asked me what I thought of Father Groppi.
I said I love him
I love the quicksand he walks on.